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Portrait of Pipsqueak by sidneyeileen Portrait of Pipsqueak by sidneyeileen
Chalk pastel pencils, conte crayon, colored pencil, and 8B graphite on colored pastel paper, 6"x10"
~8 hours

Photo reference: Pipsqueak the Tortoiseshell 2 by *carterr. Many thanks to *carterr for allowing me the use of her photo as a direct reference.

Another cute kitten drawing, this one in color. It's not as detailed as it could have been had I drawn it entirely in colored pencil, but I didn't have my normal colored pencils with me yesterday when I drew it, so I made due with the media I had on-hand. The black is the only colored pencil. The white is mostly pastel, and some conte crayon. The orange is partially sepia sketch media, and partially the paper color showing through. The pink is pastel. The grey shading is a base of 8B graphite covered with pastel.
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:iconpapercolour:
Papercolour Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
Lovely,your colours are good and the work is wery crisp!:sun:
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:iconsidneyeileen:
sidneyeileen Featured By Owner Oct 3, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you. :aww:
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:iconcmac13:
Cmac13 Featured By Owner Sep 15, 2007   General Artist
:clap: wonderful work :clap: :love: your technique :clap:
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:iconsidneyeileen:
sidneyeileen Featured By Owner Sep 15, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
Thanks! :aww:
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:iconj0rosa:
j0rosa Featured By Owner Aug 11, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
wow, the eyes really stands up, so realistic, love the way you play with your pastel:+fav:
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:iconsidneyeileen:
sidneyeileen Featured By Owner Aug 11, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you. :aww:
I rarely work with pastel, so an extra thank you. :D
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:iconj0rosa:
j0rosa Featured By Owner Aug 11, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
you're most welcome:)
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:iconmakothestrange:
makothestrange Featured By Owner Jul 23, 2007
just.. awesome!!
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:iconsidneyeileen:
sidneyeileen Featured By Owner Jul 24, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
Thanks! :aww:
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:iconparanoid-duckkie:
Paranoid-Duckkie Featured By Owner Jun 8, 2007
You are verygood at copying photos, i always think they are photos until I look closer. Great work. ^__^
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:iconsidneyeileen:
sidneyeileen Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
:blush: Thanks.
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:iconparanoid-duckkie:
Paranoid-Duckkie Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2007
You're welcome ^__^
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:iconirishtequilla:
irishtequilla Featured By Owner May 19, 2007
very cute!!
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:iconsidneyeileen:
sidneyeileen Featured By Owner May 22, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
Thanks! :aww:
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:iconpagan-inspiration:
Pagan-Inspiration Featured By Owner May 17, 2007  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Stunning, you can see the life in her eyes. :)
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:iconsidneyeileen:
sidneyeileen Featured By Owner May 17, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
:aww: Thanks!
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:iconrobertsloan2:
robertsloan2 Featured By Owner May 13, 2007
You might enjoy Derwent Drawing Pencils for this sort of thing. They are extremely soft and blend well, now available in a range of 24 colours or a 12 colour tin, both of which have the cool soft hues as well as the original 6 earth tones. I love them and it's so great Blick is carrying them now -- my first set I had to trade with ~alilone because nowhere I could find online had them in anything but those original six earth tones. Blick doesn't have the new colours in open stock yet, but that may change.
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:iconsidneyeileen:
sidneyeileen Featured By Owner May 14, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
Hopefully that will change by the time I can invest in them. I just had another person telling me about them this week, and I really like the sound of them. I would love to have some colored pencils with softer lead. I have some Verithins, but I am no more inclined to use them than I am the H harness graphites. I just don't like how pale the lead goes on the paper. If I want paper to show through the pigment, I just don't put down as much of it. The pastel pencils are great for coverage, but are so soft that I can't get the fine details. It takes a balance. The prisma's work great for most things, but there are times when I wish it was a little softer so I could do some things that the waxy texture of them just doesn't allow.
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:iconrobertsloan2:
robertsloan2 Featured By Owner May 16, 2007
When I first got my 24 color Coloursoft set, Blick had a bonus item with it of the six color bubble pack Coloursoft set. Just using the six color set I did Ruby Throated Hummingbird to see if I could get a good representative artwork with that few colored pencils. Wow. The mixtures came out perfect, I was thrilled with how they performed and was right about their choices of colors for a six color set. I would recommend getting a white Derwent Drawing Pencil to go with it if you were to stick just to using those six Coloursofts, just to blend any light applications of the very dark Indigo to sky colors and the dark brown up to lighter browns, but it's a good range. A white Prismacolor burnishing over a light application would probably work just as well.

So if you wanted to try Coloursoft without investing in a large set, the six and twelve color sets are well chosen to have a useful range. They aren't laid out like a children's set with all spectrum brights, they're clearly in an artist's palette. I seriously considered getting the 12 color set but couldn't resist getting to sample the six color set for free.

I use Verithins in combination with Prismacolors much more often than by themselves. They're good for textured applications where I need a fine point, and they're very good for getting into very small details with a fine point. They don't give me trouble with coverage if I'm only trying to fill an area a millimeter or less. I did one piece entirely with them in order to get used to them, Verithins Violets, but that's more just my way of getting used to a new set and understanding their feel. I use them in most of my saturated Prismacolor paintings because they are very good at defining those fine details -- and then I work outward from them with Prismacolors, burnish around them with Prismacolors and Art Stix. They're inexpensive and a little better than the kid sets -- I trust their lightfastness over kid sets, but they do still have that pale applications problem kid sets do.

I find myself using my 24 color Col-Erase set for some of the same purposes, with the added advantage light areas can be erased. They're by the same manufacturer and the colors match, so your kitten whisker technique would work in a colored pencil drawing if I did the initial light tonal layer with Col-Erase and then switch to Verithins and then Prismacolors working up around that white whisker to strengthen the colors in the negative space. They are very erasable and exactly comparable to an HB pencil, the feel in my hand is as if I'm using a No. 2 pencil and they lift as well as a No. 2 pencil.

I started seeing all the other Prismacolor products as part of a system that could let me use colored pencils the same ways I do graphite pencils. In my colored pencil book when I get to writing that one, I'll go into detail on the different uses for different hardnesses. I love Col-Erase for light outlines that are easily adjustable with an eraser, and like sketching with them. It's fun to be able to do the undersketch in a color related to the predominant colors that area will have when it's finished. Even being able to switch between sepia, gray and indigo underlining helps on that because if it's a related hue it won't mute or dull the lighter colors once I go over it.

As I collect the other artist grade colored pencils and build up to a palette of three or four hundred unique colors, I'm eventually going to do a hardness chart where switching brands will let me work harder to softer on a given colored pencils painting. It's something that I'd love to be able to put into a chart in the colored pencils book as a way to help people decide which colors to get in which brands.

It drove me nuts in the colored pencils books I bought that the step by step projects demanded 15 specific Prismacolors, seven Pablos, five Derwent Studio pencils, and four Design Bruynzeel colors exactly. What I'll do with the projects in mine is to set up a reasonable color chart similar to a standard 24 color set and in projects, go by "match the printed color chip out of your set" with more descriptive color names and maybe listing the Prismacolor number for the color. Then list by "hard" and "soft." Crayola is inexpensive and has good pigment saturation for a hard colored pencil, if the book's owner is not able to afford a set of Verithins as well as a set of artist pencils.

I'm also going to encourage big sets for frugality because they are. There's a fear some of the authors had about getting colors you'll never use, but I found that I actually used them -- especially when I wore down all of my favorites. The cost per pencil drops dramatically even at list prices between buying a large set and buying only the colors you want in open stock. I've substituted darker browns for lighter browns by going more lightly and burnishing, combined colors to get hues that I wore out the favorite pencil and sometimes let the long pencils decide the subject if I'm looking for an idea -- pick one that I don't use often and then draw something that's predominantly that color.

I've particularly wound up letting the reds, oranges and yellows get long because the browns, blues and greens wear down so fast, so I'll do something floral or a fruit still life or a sunset if my set tilts that direction too far. For a long time the pinks and purples barely got used, but then I started doing florals and grinding my teeth over limited purples. It's easier now with multiple sets to find the color I want, if I combine them and do mean to do a heavily purple piece, I can find all the hues I need and still wind up doing a lot of mixing on the paper in layers.

I agree with you that the Prismacolors work great for most things. Coloursoft go one step farther and that means I'd definitely want to use Verithins or something that holds a harder point for fine details -- the combination of Derwent Artist/Studio pencils and Coloursoft is comparable to Verithins with Prismacolors and has the added advantage that Derwent's Studio pencils come in a 72 color range too instead of only half the range, Artist comes in 120 colors.

I might eventually pick up a Studio set to cut back on the number of Artist replacements I need to do out of open stock, because it's harder for me to find Artist pencils in open stock. I got my Derwent Artist set from ASW on sale because they carry the 120 color set in a wood box at a very deep discount when it's on sale, it was $99 when I got it. I love the box. I get tempted because they still have the same sale, to try to wear it down evenly and just replace the set when I use them up, so that I can use that nice wood box for another set -- the trays actually grip the pencils nicely and while they're slightly oversize, there are a lot of other good pencils that are also oversize and I don't think standard-width pencils would fall out easily.

I've been thinking about going professional again with my art right after recertification of my Social Security in June... so that I can get to fully self employed before I have to do recertification again. ~kitten42 brought me a brochure for a gallery in Lawrence that seems to like Impressionism and other representative art styles, most of the artists they show are at least somewhat representative. I suspect one of two things: either they do not like colored pencil realism and prefer impressionism, or, they haven't got anyone in this area who does the newest style of extreme realism, the crystal-and-silver watercolor paintings and the colored pencil painting style.

If it's the latter, I'd wind up getting in easily but wouldn't produce many large pieces a year. The prices they usually charge at that gallery for pastels and looser paintings are such that I could reasonably set a higher price on colored pencil paintings that would be feasible given the time involved in large pieces. I'm also not sure whether they might be open to finely detailed smaller Prismacolor paintings, 8" x 10" and so on, that can be finished in a reasonable amount of time.

I'll know when I go in with my portfolio and show them the things I've done. Because they're that high end and my current best works are pieces I don't want to sell, I'd have to prepare by doing some pieces I plan to sell, enough that if they do want them, I can let them go. I'm pretty sure I could get in either way. I got into galleries several times in New Orleans and I'm much better now than I was, my architecturals were dreadful but they took them. My problem there was that I didn't make any sales once I framed pieces and showed them in galleries. I got attention and no sales. I was also charging very low prices and not very good at the types of work I was trying to sell.

Doing it now, I think I'd deliberately do a series of pastel landscapes based on the local area, and some larger watercolors, and maybe one or two good colored pencil realism pieces just to see what moves -- and price comparable to the other artists in the gallery, trusting that the gallery knows what collectors want to spend on walking in. Not going too far above or below that usual price at first except maybe on the Prismacolor paintings because those take so darn long to do well and I could afford to just let it sit there gathering interest and attention. Or do one large painting and then several smaller ones so that if a collector loves that style, they're not limited to the one they'd be straining their budget to get.

I know now that my choice of subjects down in New Orleans had something to do with why my art wasn't selling in galleries. Big cats done life size are viscerally appealing, but not many people want to live with them for some reason I don't quite fully understand. According to Kitten, I'd have done better with deer and huntable wildlife. I may give that a try, though cats are an important personal meaning for me and I'll always love drawing and painting cats.

It's funny, here on deviantART, I see so many tigers that I think I was doing something most artists do -- drawing tigers because they're beautiful and there's something viscerally satisfying about drawing a gorgeous tiger well. Maybe artists being independent identify more with tigers and see them in ways different from people who are just buying art rather than doing it. I often did my big cats in a friendly or relaxed mood, and the full sheet pastel painting cougar or tiger would seem lifelike hanging in my apartment -- and have the emotional kick of "there's a friendly cat over there." Cat people got it and would sometimes remark on how I'd gotten their expression so well, anyone used to housecats can read tiger body language.

What I saw in the Signs of Life Gallery's brochure and website were a lot of pleasant landscapes, sometimes in wild jazzy colors and sometimes realistically rendered in soft impressionism, a range in between. One painter got some sharp realism into a winter scene that took my breath away. So I know that the usual collectors who visit that gallery would probably respond well to landscapes and I'm not going to throw in jungles and tigers where they wouldn't move, let alone a series of prehistoric animals. I still want to do one, but what I might do with those is just create a calendar with prehistoric animals. Some art might sell better as prints than as originals.

Hehehe -- tigers would probably go well in a calendar format, because the same people who don't buy tiger paintings adore tiger calendars in photography. I see them every year in every store, so that's the way to get my big cats to market -- with the advantage that I still get to live with my big cats once I've put that much work into them.

~kitten42 pointed out to me that having an art career would not hurt my writing career at all and would help sell my how-to art books. I'm starting to understand some of the reasons why when I was a professional artist, I hit burnout and was turned off to galleries or fine art at all, something that I'll go into in my journal today because I had some new insights in a discussion last night. I've got a passion to write and illustrate those how to draw books that goes way beyond the idea that writing some nonfiction would raise my income versus sticking completely to fantasy and science fiction, and be more fun than doing mainstream fiction. It's coming together for me.

So if you're interested, check out today's journal -- it is likely to turn a little heavy and it's tying together several of my old rants into a more complete idea and a better understanding of why I have to write Street Sketching. Read the blog when you're in a ruminative mood, because I would appreciate depth commentary on today's journal.
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:iconsidneyeileen:
sidneyeileen Featured By Owner Jun 5, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
Again, sorry for the lateness of my reply. I really do feel bad that it took me so long just to get around to reading this entire message.

Thank you so much for your insight into the different brands and lines of colored pencils. When I am able to invest in more media, your experiences will save me much indecision and insecurity.

Good luck with the galleries! It sounds as though you have a very balanced, more experienced approach to gallery sales than you did before, and I'm sure it will serve you well. I have refrained from approaching any galleries myself for exactly the reason you stated - I don't have any pieces available that I could part with if they wanted my art. The one gallery that does want my art came about because of a conversation, and the woman who owns it has kindly been giving me advice about how to set up a professional portfolio and present myself to art galleries and collectors. I wish I could take my art over to her right now and give it to her, for I have enough pieces, but I can't afford to frame them yet. In her case, she knew what kind of art she wanted from me, and I have created a number of realistic cat piece with the intention of giving her a number to choose from. On the bright side, the longer it takes, the more time I will have to make pieces for her, and the more I will have to give her if those sell. Since she specifically asked for them, I think the odds of them selling are pretty good, since she knows her gallery audience.

I agree with you entirely about some pieces selling better as prints than originals. It's a different audience, and I have noticed that the audience that has money for originals, and the audience that doesn't, are often interested in very different pieces of art. I think tigers, and other large cats, would sell beautifully as a calendar, and probably as posters and prints as well. As an original, I could see them selling, but not in just any gallery. It would need to be for sale in an area populated with cat people, because as you pointed out, cat people can read the expression on a tiger's face. After all, our house cats are essentially the same critter, just small enough that they can't kill us in one bite when upset. ;)

I think that art careers and writing careers can be extremely supportive of each other. For myself, I can't write a story very well, but my best friend can. We are contemplating the possibility of producing some sort of collaborative comic/manga in a year or two, and I've been telling her she should write a children's book for me to illustrate..... I just wish I had time to draw all the art that is in my head, finish all the projects I have started, and begin so many more that I would love to do. My biggest distractions are time and focus. If I could get myself to work more efficiently, maybe I would have more time to finish the art.
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:iconrobertsloan2:
robertsloan2 Featured By Owner Jun 5, 2007
Don't worry about it. I get pretty slow and late with my answers too sometimes depending on what's going on in life or my health or both.

I just get into long convoluted exchanges and deep is more fun than timely to me, so seriously, don't ever worry about taking your time to answer anything! I of all people do not worry about it, not when I could be offline for weeks on health reasons or something.

I've found something that may be a lot better than a gallery for me, and it's stimulating by what they actually want. The Sacred Sword is an interesting new age shop in Lawrence that carries knives and swords and also has candles, incense, a lot of new age supplies and books -- and art by local artists. There's a need for mythological and religious paintings of traditional subjects in any style where they're recognizable, any deity or spirit or mythic being I cared to paint would go over well.

I wanted to do mythic and religious subjects for years, and from what I've heard of the shop, it'll move fast there when I do those. I can also indulge myself a bit and do oils, do acrylics, do various other mediums and just price according to what I spent on it in time and materials or what I think it's worth, without the markup being as extreme as a gallery.

One of the owners is a friend of my son in law and I know this shop has been in business for a long time and attracts a steady clientele. So I can do everything from little ATCs and 4" x 6" pieces in an album to hanging big cool paintings on the walls, do them specifically for the shop with a theme, keep my favorites and not worry about trying to keep to subjects a gallery would want. I'm not sure how galleries would feel about my doing Pan or Odin although if I did coloured pencil realism I could probably sell still lifes and landscapes easily.

Ooooh, you have a point about prints and posters. All my life I've seen large tiger posters and leopard posters in the posters bins anywhere that sells posters. Big cats drawn or photographed realistically are a staple in the posters and prints market, it's whether collectors want the original of the big cat that's up in the air. So my big cats could sell better as prints and that could be fun. Also some of them aren't large pieces.

I have a Derwent Artist Pencils piece going of a leopard in a tree, that's currently titled A Spotless Leopard because I got in all his toning and musculature and nary a spot on him yet. I need to go back over him with black, dark brown and dark blue to get in all of his spots next, develop the tree and foliage more and finish him sometime. It's not a big piece, I think it's about 6" x 9" or something like that, but it's very realistic. I'm enjoying it and once I finish up some of my trade art, may pick it up again and finish it -- and then put it out as prints, because I could blow up that image much larger on the scan if I used the highest resolution on my scanner for the upload image.

I think you're right, that some people do combine art careers and writing careers. But for me it's got to slant more toward the writing -- if it gets to the point where one of them has to go or get less attention, I'd rather stay professional with writing and go on doing art purely for the love of it. I lose something if I have to do art for others and get away from what I want to draw into what will sell, but I have much less problem with that in writing.

What I'm thinking of doing this summer is combining them in yet another way -- by illustrating some of my soft-market and independent productions. Regular publishing pays much higher but the pay comes in on a slow boat from Mars -- you can send in a book and not actually get an acceptance for a year from when it was sent in, and then not get paid for a year till it actually comes up on the docket (though usually for books they'll give an advance at the point of acceptance). So that means doing a lot of work and not even knowing if I'll get paid till a year later.

Versus ebook markets and small press without advance, that might not pay an advance but could be sending out a royalty check a quarter later, three months after I send it through. This would help for getting on my feet financially, so I've been thinking of doing this with some of my short novels. Down in the indie and small press markets, they may welcome my doing my own covers and if I come up with professional quality grabby cover images, that may sell a lot more copies of my books.

I know I'll be doing this with Thirteen Tales of Terror, my first pseudonym production as Guy Krieg. I have my horror stories going out under that name so that horror readers don't get disappointed getting fantasy and vice versa. If you look back through my gallery, there are nine or ten pieces I did in a series with Derwent Graphitints. These are 8B soft watersoluble graphite pencils with "a hint of colour." They still look shimmery grayish graphitish but when wetted it's more than a dash of colour -- it's strong rich colour with a shimmery gray graphite undertone. Not as bright as other coloured pencil or watercolour pieces, but much brighter than Graphitints dry. The browns especially look like old tyme sepiatone photography if done photorealistic, once the blues and violets and russets are in, it starts looking like tinted black and white photos.

The one thing I did not expect using these, and I did come to love them, was that every subject I drew looked eerie. Downright spooky sometimes. I did a seal diving under ice and he looks almost malevolent. So what would be better than using those pencils to illustrate a scene out of one of the scary stories and come up with a nonstandard but very spooky looking cover illustration -- then illustrate each of the stories and put its image into the book with the format so that the reader gets a fun illustrated book of scary stories? I did landscapes and nature scenes, but I could just as easily do ghoulies and ghosties and beasts that are scary.

So that's one project that combines both as much as a children's book would, and I may do the same with a fantasy novel depending on how short it is and what I do with it, how visual it is. Whether I can actually draw everything in it accurately (or at least everything that would be screaming to be drawn!).

I'll have fun with it -- and I'll probably start up on all this even when I recertify, so that I don't have to recertify again two years down the road. Better if I do recertify so that I don't have to jump in the deep end with survival right off the top, that could get very stressful.

I have that same problem with time and focus, compounded by interruptions of health crashes that break my immersion. If I set aside something half done it's sometimes almost impossible to pick it up again. I lose the original idea and its intensity, though not always. With the Spotless Leopard, what's left is just following the reference at this point, I already did anything difficult in it.

Right now I'm learning to sketch more and sketch quickly. I think that will help with getting all the art that's in my head down on a page in some form, and I sometimes find myself looking at smaller finished artworks as potentially something to redo in larger or more difficult formats, or several times over in different mediums. I figure I will get around to all of them someday and that other than trade art, half-finished projects can just sit around for the day I feel like finishing something rather than starting something new -- that day comes once in a while like a mood. This is one reason why I'm so drawn to keeping art amateur, but to sell Street Sketching I need to go pro with it at least sometimes.
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:iconsidneyeileen:
sidneyeileen Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
The Sacred Sword sounds like an amazing opportunity, and exactly the sort of shop I wish I could find around here! Do they have a web site, and would you mind if I jumped on the bandwagon? Even though I haven't put together any religious pieces yet, they might be interested in the knotwork? If nothing else, I would love to contact them after I do have religious pieces drawn.

I've been spending a bit of time learning how to draw simpler sketches, and create lineart from those sketches. I would like very much to be proficient in a style of art that I like, and that is fast enough to allow for less expensive commissions, particularly for the anthropomorphic community. It would also be good practice for a comic book project I may get involved in in another year or two. That's the thing about line art. I really like some of it - especially anime style, but I see it as a story-telling medium. There are very few pieces in that style that I see as exceptional, stand-alone art pieces. They really have to be incredibly detailed and precise. Otherwise, it's the setting, the story, the characters, and the associations that make lineart good. That's why I think it would be great for my anthro art. Most commissions in anthro art are of personal characters with a story behind them.
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:iconrobertsloan2:
robertsloan2 Featured By Owner Jun 23, 2007
I don't know if they have a website, I will have to ask ~HeraldoftheAbyss about it. I found out I can't do it until I've sold novels, because I might lose my medical coverage to becoming self supporting so I need more of an income than that in order to do anything on the side for trickle incomes. Bites, and it's government waste at its idiotic height.

I know most shops I've seen that were pagan or new age would go crazy for your knotwork, including hand colored prints or limited edition prints too. If you do any, note me with links -- or note ~HeraldoftheAbyss about the shop because he's the one who knows the owner. They might be interested even if you're out of town.

I've had another breakthrough in illustration lately, just posted it. The sketch was done from life in 2000 with my friend kidding around doing a magical gesture, the ghosts are all from my imagination and most were added after I started painting. I choked on not having the skills to take it beyond the sketch and not having the right wet medium -- but Inktense proved to be the right wet medium and I'm very happy with it.
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:iconrobertsloan2:
robertsloan2 Featured By Owner May 13, 2007
Awww cute! I love the pose too. Again you've got perfect white whiskers, fantastic!
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:iconsidneyeileen:
sidneyeileen Featured By Owner May 14, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
:D Thanks!
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:iconrobertsloan2:
robertsloan2 Featured By Owner May 17, 2007
You're welcome!
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:iconexquisitefeline:
exquisitefeline Featured By Owner May 9, 2007
:wow:
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:iconsidneyeileen:
sidneyeileen Featured By Owner May 9, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
:bow:
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:iconzaradei:
zaradei Featured By Owner May 8, 2007
Wow, amazing picture!! you are so talented!
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:iconsidneyeileen:
sidneyeileen Featured By Owner May 9, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
:blush: Thanks! I'm glad you like it.
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:iconzaradei:
zaradei Featured By Owner May 9, 2007
You are very welcome!
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:iconcrimson-princess:
Crimson-Princess Featured By Owner May 8, 2007   Artist
Aww! That is sooo dang cute! Absolutely wonderful job!
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:iconsidneyeileen:
sidneyeileen Featured By Owner May 9, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
Thanks!
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:iconsugabear:
sugabear Featured By Owner May 7, 2007  Hobbyist Photographer
Awww...this is so cute! Beautiful job here!
:heart: X 100
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:iconsidneyeileen:
sidneyeileen Featured By Owner May 8, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
:D Glad you like it!
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:iconartistsforanimals:
ArtistsforAnimals Featured By Owner May 7, 2007
looks fantastic sweetie you did an excellent job :clap:
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:iconsidneyeileen:
sidneyeileen Featured By Owner May 7, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you. :D
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:iconartistsforanimals:
ArtistsforAnimals Featured By Owner May 7, 2007
You're welcome ^^
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:iconlennan:
lennan Featured By Owner May 7, 2007
The eyes, the eyes! It's so very cute, but i think the eyes are the most striking part of all =)
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:iconsidneyeileen:
sidneyeileen Featured By Owner May 7, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you! The eyes were very difficult on this one. I thought for a bit that I wasn't going to be able to get them to turn out at all. I think I fiddled with those for about an hour alone. :nod:
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:iconlennan:
lennan Featured By Owner May 9, 2007
It was well worth the effort you spent! =D And you're welcome!
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:iconallue:
allue Featured By Owner May 7, 2007
:heart::clap:
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:iconsidneyeileen:
sidneyeileen Featured By Owner May 7, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
:bow:
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:iconspookowl:
spookowl Featured By Owner May 7, 2007
awww what and adorable kitty! I love how you used the paper tone to your advantage! great joB!
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:iconsidneyeileen:
sidneyeileen Featured By Owner May 7, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
Thanks! Anytime I use colored paper, I will usually select the color based on those in the piece, perferably so that it compliments and backs up the piece. If you select a clashing color paper, it becomes much more difficult to make the colors in the piece true, but if the color is very complimentary, it can actually reduce the amount of work involved in creating the piece.
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:iconspookowl:
spookowl Featured By Owner May 8, 2007
very true..though sometimes making a clashing color scheme can be fun ^___^ I love playing with stuff like that myself
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:iconsidneyeileen:
sidneyeileen Featured By Owner May 9, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
You're much better at that than I am. :nod:
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:iconspookowl:
spookowl Featured By Owner May 9, 2007
hehehe its one of my natural talents...but you sure kick my tooshie at photo realism lol
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:iconitsmymagicworld:
ItsmyMagicWorld Featured By Owner May 7, 2007
Wow beautiful! from a distance I thought it was a photo
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:iconsidneyeileen:
sidneyeileen Featured By Owner May 7, 2007  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you! :aww:
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